Switch statement in C

Switch Statement in C

most flexible program control statement is the switch statement, which lets your program execute different statements based on an expression that can have more than two values. Earlier control statements, such as if, were limited to evaluating an expression that could have only two values: true or false. To control program flow based on more than two values, you had to use multiple nested if statements. The general form of the switch statement is as follows:


  //syntex
  switch (expression)
  {
      case  template_1: statement(s);
      case  template_2: statement(s);
      ....................
      case  template_n: statement(s);
      default: statement(s);
  }

In this statement, expression is any expression that evaluates to an integer value: type long, int, orchar. The switch statement evaluates expression and compares the value against the templates following each case label. Then one of the following happens:

Switch Statement in C language

  #include 
  int main()
  {
       int num=2;
       switch(num+2)
       {
           case 1:
             printf("Case1: Value is: %d", num);
           case 2:
             printf("Case1: Value is: %d", num);
           case 3:
             printf("Case1: Value is: %d", num);
           default:
             printf("Default: Value is: %d", num);
      }
      return 0;
  }

If expression evaluates to true, statement1 is executed. If expression evaluates to false, control goes to the else statement, statement2, which is then executed. Both statement1 and statement2 can be compound statements or blocks.

Code Example Switch Statement


   /* Demonstrates the switch statement. */ 2: 3:
   //puts like as printf
   #include<stdio.h>
      int main( void )
      6:  {
      7:      int reply;
      8:
      9:      puts(“Enter a number between 1 and 5:”);
      10:     scanf(“%d”, &reply);
      11:
      12:     switch (reply)
      13:     {
      14:         case 1:
      15:             puts(“You entered 1.”);
      16:         case 2:
      17:             puts(“You entered 2.”);
      18:         case 3:
      19:             puts(“You entered 3.”);
      20:         case 4:
      21:             puts(“You entered 4.”);
      22:         case 5:
      23:             puts(“You entered 5.”);
      24:         default:
      25:             puts(“Out of range, try again.”);
      26:     }
      27:
      28:     return 0;
      29: }

  

Code Example Switch Statement

 #include 
  int main()
  {
       int i=2;
       switch (i)
       {
          case 1:
             printf("Case1 ");
          case 2:
             printf("Case2 ");
          case 3:
             printf("Case3 ");
          case 4:
             printf("Case4 ");
          default:
             printf("Default ");
       }
      return 0;
  }